DUBLIN BANJOSSully and Johnny Keenan

- solo and duo tenor banjos; with Suzie Sullivan( bodhran and bouzouki), Jeri Keenan (guitar).

 

CD  Album number  HM309

1.     MY LOVE IS IN AMERICA/TOSS THE FEATHERS

2.     CAROLAN'S DRAUGHT

3.     STEAMPACKET. MORNING STAR

4.     DOWN THE BRAES/CENTENARY MARCH

5.     IDLE ROAD/OLD HAG YOU HAVE KILLED ME

6.     ANDY BOYLE'S/HEYDEN FANCY/SWEENEY'S POLKA

7.     GOLD RING

8.     BLACKBIRD

9.     PIPE ON THE HOB/YELLOW WATTLE

10.  DUNMORE LASSIES/TIM MOLONEY'S

11.  JAPANESE HORNPIPE

12.  TRIP TO THE COTTAGE/FATHER O'FLYNN

13.  KNOCKNAGREE REEL/RED HAIRED LASS

14.  EAVESDROPPER/KISS ME KATE

15.  CARRICK ON BANNOW/MISS GALVIN

16.  LITTLE STACK OF WHEAT/FAIRIES' HORNPIPE

17.  SULLY'S EMPTY POCKETS

18.  CROOKED REEL

19.  GIVE US A DRINK OF WATER/GUSTY'S FROLICS (extra track)

 

Also:

*BOOK ( MUSIC AND TAB)  catalogue number HM4010

 Learn from Sully, and Dublin’s legendary banjoist Johnny Keenan.

This unique recording of "the Travelling Style" gives you an opportunity to learn to play in a style that is deeply rooted in the Irish tradition.

A landmark of duo and solo playing to learn from.

The book teaches things never revealed before: techniques, style, repertoire and interpretation – in music and TAB with chord symbols.

This is the late John Keenan's largest collection of recorded material.

His name is remembered in the annual Johnny Keenan Banjo Festival at Longford.

CD HM309  *AUDIO CASSETTE HM309

 

 Sully (Tony Sullivan) and John Keenan - Dublin Banjos (Halshaw Music, Cassette, HM309)

Published in conjunction with one of Sully's series of banjo tuition books, this is one of the few tuition recordings (Matt Cranitch's "Take A Bow" is one other which springs readily to mind) which is a good listen per se. Both Sully and Johnny Keenan - brother of ex-Bothy Band piper and whistle-player, Paddy Keenan - are legendary banjo players and these naturalistic recordings, which feature a number of solo recordings by both players, as well as tight duets, give a real flavour of the crack both must have in putting the cassette together.

Sadly, Johnny Keenan is no longer with us and though his influence was huge (witness the Johnny Keenan Banjo Festival which look set to become an annual event), this remains the largest published collection of recordings.

Keenan's playing - like that of Sully, in fact - is less dependent on right-hand trickery than a lot of the up-and-coming breed of banjo players. Which is not to say that it lacks ornamentation. However both players are keener than most banjo players in the pantheon to use effects other than rapid triplets (or other -ets) to colour a tune. The music is more accessible as a result.

The choice of tunes is exemplary and the discerning player will doubtless incorporate several of these into his or her repertoire. We were most impressed by Keenan's ... and by Sully's march set .../The Centenary March.

However the key charm of the album is its "low-keyness" - the microphone, it appears, just happens to have been left on while these two consummate traditional musicians were playing. Consequently there is little if any distance between listener and performer - surely the watermark of the best in traditional playing.

 

 

Review by AIDAN CROSSEY in: http://www.paythereckoning.com/reviews20022003.html#sully

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